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DIY: At-Home Simple Syrups

DIY: At-Home Simple Syrups

If you can make a box of Jell-O, you can make your own syrups for craft cocktails. Seriously. The classic simple syrup is just sugar dissolved in boiling water, then cooled, and cocktail syrup recipes just keep getting more exciting from there. By making your own syrups, you also get to control the quality of the ingredients, putting only the best stuff in and keeping nasty chemicals out. It's a win, win, WIN.

Basic instructions:
A basic simple syrup is 1 part sugar, 1 part water -- 2 parts sugar, 1 part water for thicker, richer syrups that keep longer. Simply boil your water and sugar together and stir until dissolved, then transfer to a bottle with a stopper and store in the fridge for up to a month (6 months for thicker 2:1 ratio syrup).

Try making these recipes:

Our Favorite Signature Cocktail:

Blackberry Sage Bourbon Smash

By Denise Woodward, Chez Us 

 Ingredients:

  •  8 blackberries, the bigger the better
  • 1 oz sage simple syrup (1/2 cup unrefined sugar and 1/2 cup water, 5 sage leaves)
  • 2 oz Four Roses Bourbon
  • Crushed Ice
  • Tonic Water
  • Blackberry and sage leave, as garnish

Directions:

  • Making the simple syrup: place all the ingredients for the simple syrup into a sauce pan, bring to a boil, then turn off the head and let sit until cooled. Strain into a glass bottle and use for fall cocktails
  • Place 8 blackberries and 1 ounce of the simple syrup into a large glass and muddle.  Add the bourbon and give a quick muddle
  • Fill a cocktail glass with crushed ice and pour in the blackberry bourbon mixture.  Stir.
  • Top with some tonic water
  • Garnish. Serve. Drink. 
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